Mali – Invisible War by Jérôme Delay

Alors que le gouvernement français met tout en oeuvre pour empêcher la couverture par les médias de la guerre engagée au Mali, le reporter Jérôme Delay, envoyé sur place, vient de transmettre au Time, via l’AP, ses dernières photographies. Des images intenses où la beauté naturelle du pays contraste avec les scènes de guerre. Dans le texte qu’il adjoint aux clichés, Jérôme Delay explique la difficulté pour la presse d’être présente. Mais, si le front demeure pour l’instant inaccessible, « l’histoire doit, d’une forme ou d’une autre, être contée… »
Mali - Invisible War by Jérôme Delay
Mali  army cadets secure a perimeter on the military side of  Bamako’s airport Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013, during a joined visit to French and Malian troops by Mali’s President  Dioncounda Traore and French Ambassador to Mali  Christian Rouyer. French troops pressed northward in Mali toward territory occupied by radical Islamists on Wednesday, military officials said, announcing the start of a land assault that will put soldiers in direct combat « within hours. » (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 
Mali - Invisible War by Jérôme Delay
Bystanders stand by a French APC as a French Puma transport helicopter lands to test the field in the center of Niono, some 400 kms (300 miles) North of the capital Bamako Sunday Jan. 20, 2013. French troops encircled a key Malian town on Friday, trying to stop radical Islamists from striking against communities closer to the capital and cutting off their supply line, a French official said. The move around Diabaly came as French and Malian authorities said that the city whose capture prompted the French military intervention in the first place was no longer in the hands of the extremists. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 
Jérôme Delay
A French soldier waits for a French Puma transport helicopter  to land on the soccer stadium to test the field in the center of Niono, some 400 kms (300 miles) North of the capital Bamako Sunday Jan. 20, 2013. French troops encircled a key Malian town on Friday, trying to stop radical Islamists from striking against communities closer to the capital and cutting off their supply line, a French official said. The move around Diabaly came as French and Malian authorities said that the city whose capture prompted the French military intervention in the first place was no longer in the hands of the extremists.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 
Jérôme Delay
Worshipers pray in the mosque in  Banamba, Mali, some 140 kms (80 miles) North of the capital Bamako Friday Jan. 18, 2013. French troops encircled a key Malian town on Friday, trying to stop radical Islamists from striking against communities closer to the capital and cutting off their supply line, a French official said. The move around DIabaly came as French and Malian authorities said that the city whose capture prompted the French military intervention in the first place was no longer in the hands of the extremists. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

Children and adults alike play soccer on a dusty field in Segou, central Mali, some 240 km (140 miles) from Bamako Monday Jan. 21, 2013.  French troops in armored personnel carriers rolled through the streets of Diabaly on Monday, winning praise from residents of this besieged town after Malian forces retook control of it with French help a week after radical Islamists invaded. The Islamists also have deserted the town of Douentza, which they had held since September, according to a local official who said French and Malian forces arrived there on Monday as well. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

Malian women sift wheat in a field near  Segou, central Mali, some 240kms (140 miles) from Bamako Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013.  French troops in armored personnel carriers rolled through the streets of Diabaly on Monday, winning praise from residents of this besieged town after Malian forces retook control of it with French help a week after radical Islamists invaded. The Islamists also have deserted the town of Douentza, which they had held since September, according to a local official who said French and Malian forces arrived there on Monday as well. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

In this image taken during an official visit organized by the Malian army to the town of Konna, some 680 kilometers (430 miles) north of Mali’s capital Bamako, Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, a charred helmet lays on the ground of a destroyed base used by islamist rebels.  One wing of Mali’s Ansar Dine rebel group has split off to create its own movement, saying that they want to negotiate a solution to the crisis in Mali, in a declaration that indicates at least some of the members of the al-Qaida linked group are searching for a way out of the extremist movement in the wake of French air strikes. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

Adama Drabo, 16, sits in the police station in Sevare, some 620 kilometers (385 miles) north of Mali’s capital Bamako Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. Drabo,  who said he was captured travelling without papers by Malian troops and eventually handed over to Gendarmes in Sevare, was arrested on suspicion of working for Islamic militant group MUJAO and caught trying to flee south, Police said. A farmer’s son from Niono, he  admitted to having worked in the kitchens of a jihadist training base in Douentza for the past month. Drabo said his only motivation in joining the Islamic militant group had been to earn a wage, having struggled to find work at home, and that he was one of the youngest recruits on the base. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A young child runs through a deserted side street in Gao, northern Mali, Monday Jan. 28, 2013, the day after French and Malian troops secured a strategic bridge and the airport there as they pressed northward toward Timbuktu. Malian troops backed by French helicopters and paratroopers entered the fabled city of Timbuktu on Monday after al-Qaida-linked militants fled into the desert. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A suspected Islamist extremist who was beaten by the crowd lies in the back of an army truck in Gao, northern Mali, Tuesday Jan. 29, 2013. Four suspects were arrested after being found by a youth militia calling themselves the « Gao Patrolmen ». Malian soldiers prevented the mob from lynching them. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

During an official visit organized by the French military, French troops are positioned overlooking the bridge crossing the river Niger at the entrance of Gao, Northern Mali, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013. Islamist extremists fled the city Saturday after French, Chadian and Nigerien troops arrived, ending 10 months of radical Islamic control over the city. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A Malian man sits on a window sill to watch the Nigeria versus Mali Africa Cup of Nations semifinal soccer match taking place in South Africa, in Gao, northern Mali, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

FILE – In this Jan. 31, 2013 file photo, Issa Alzouma, 39, poses in front of his home in Gao, northern Mali, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013. Alzouma’s arm was amputated by Islamist radicals on Dec. 21, 2012, after an Islamic tribunal charged him with spying. Alzouma, a father of three, denied the charges, and said he was just changing the faulty plug on his motorcycle’s engine alongside the road. The extremists fled the city Saturday as French, Chadian and Nigerian troops arrived, ending 10 months of radical Islamic control over the city. But the intervention came too late for Alzouma and the other men who lost their hands and probably their livelihoods, too, when the militants carried out amputations as punishments for theft and other alleged crimes under their strict interpretation of Shariah, or Islamic law. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
 

Well-wishers gather to greet French President Francois Hollande during his two-hour-long visit to Timbuktu, Mali, Saturday Feb. 2, 2013.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A Malian man dressed in green walks between green doors of closed shops in Gao, northern Mali, Tuesday Feb. 5, 2013.  Troops from France and Chad moved into Kidal in an effort to secure the strategic north Malian city, a French official said Tuesday, as the international force put further pressure on the Islamic extremists to push them out of their last major bastion of control in the north.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A Malian woman waits at a checkpoint on the banks of the Niger river outside Gao, northern Mali, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013. French troops began to withdraw from Timbuktu Thursday after securing the fabled city as they ramped up their mission in another northern Mali city, searching for Islamic extremists who may be mixing among the local population. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

Footprints from worshippers are left in the sand at the ancient Askia mausoleum’s mosque, built in 1495 in Gao, northern Mali, Saturday Feb. 9, 2013.  On Friday, a suicide bomber on a motorcycle killed himself attempting to blow up an army checkpoint, the first time a suicide bomber operated in Mali. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

Worshippers arrive for prayers at the Askia mausoleum’s mosque, built in 1495 in Gao, northern Mali, Saturday Feb. 9, 2013.  On Friday, a suicide bomber on a motorcycle killed himself attempting to blow up an army checkpoint, the first time a suicide bomber operated in Mali. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A Malian  officer closes a cell where suspected  Islamist rebel group the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, MUJAO, fighters are held in Gao, northern Mali, Monday Feb. 11 2013, one day after MUJAO fighters engaged in a firefight with Malian forces.The attack in Gao shows the Islamic fighters, many of them well armed and with combat experience, are determined and daring and it foreshadows a protracted campaign by France and other nations to restore government control in this vast Saharan nation in northwest Africa.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

ED’S NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT – Several bodies lie at the bottom of a well, Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, in Sevare, some 620 kilometers north of Mali’s capital, Bamako. A witness told The Associated Press that he saw soldiers fatally shoot at least three people at a nearby bus stop and dump their bodies in the well. Mali’s government is warning soldiers to respect human rights following reports of the civilians being killed. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A suspected member of  Islamist rebel group the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, MUJAO, sticks his hand out of the cell where  suspected  fighters are held in Gao, northern Mali, Monday Feb. 11 2013, one day after MUJAO fighters engaged in a firefight with Malian forces. The attack in Gao shows the Islamic fighters, many of them well armed and with combat experience, are determined and daring and it foreshadows a protracted campaign by France and other nations to restore government control in this vast Saharan nation in northwest Africa.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT  Malian people gather around the leg of an Islamic fighter outside the police station in Gao, northern Mali, Monday Feb. 11, 2013, one day after Mujao fighters engaged in a firefight with Malian forces. French and Malian government forces have regained control of this northern city, after Islamic fighters fought a prolonged battle. Hospital officials and witnesses say three civilians died in the fighting Sunday. It is not known how many extremists and Malian troops died in the more than five hours of combat. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

Malian children walk outside a Madrassa, or koranic school in  Gao, northern Mali, Wednesday  Feb. 13, 2013. French soldiers on Wednesday recovered an enormous stash of explosives that authorities believe radical Islamic fighters were using to make bombs for attacks on northern Mali’s largest city, a Malian military spokesman said. Daouda Diarra said that the French military removed some 800 kilograms (1,700 pounds) of explosive materials from a house in Gao’s Chateau neighborhood. The explosives had been discovered several days earlier, and the team had returned to the site Wednesday, Diarra said. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
 

A Young  Malian girl walks in a Madrassa, or koranic school in  Gao, northern Mali, Wednesday  Feb. 13, 2013. French soldiers on Wednesday recovered an enormous stash of explosives that authorities believe radical Islamic fighters were using to make bombs for attacks on northern Mali’s largest city, a Malian military spokesman said. Daouda Diarra said that the French military removed some 800 kilograms (1,700 pounds) of explosive materials from a house in Gao’s Chateau neighborhood. The explosives had been discovered several days earlier, and the team had returned to the site Wednesday, Diarra said. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Images © Time/AP/Jérôme Delay

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